CEO of Wellbeing of Women – Tina Weaver | Women Influencers Interview | Womens Day | Hobbs

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In her former career as a journalist and editor, Tina Weaver, aimed to make a difference. Her mission at Wellbeing of Women – a charity dedicated to improving the health of women and babies – is just the same. She tells us how her work motivates her and why it’s her proudest achievement.

WHAT'S YOUR MORNING ROUTINE?

I’ll admit I’m not a very good morning person! It’s not helped by having had my little one, Wilfie who’s four, clamber into my bed during the night and kick me awake at hourly intervals. My alarm plays an irritatingly cheerful song at 6.30am. I race to wake my oldest son, who, being a teenager would probably sleep 23 hours a day if allowed. Most mornings I blend spinach, avocado, celery and carrot into a delicious green sludge for me, while the children will have cereal.

I wear ankle skimming trousers and boots or a dress to work, and often slip on trainers to battle the Northern Line. Since my 20s I’ve had key pieces of Hobbs clothes – skirts, well-made jumpers and a few trousers – I love the flattering tailoring. I wear tinted moisturiser, Lancôme mascara and Chanel lipgloss, and not much else on my face. I leave home around 8am, drop my youngest at school, and get to my office just before 9am.

WHAT'S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR DAY?

Tragic as it is, I look forward to my first (of several) lattes with a slightly irrational desperation!

WHAT CHALLENGES HAVE YOU FACED IN YOUR CAREER, AND HOW HAVE YOU OVERCOME THEM?

As a young journalist, the challenge was always to break stories that have an impact and that would set the agenda. As I progressed up to Editor level – I was Editor of the Sunday Mirror for 12 years and Deputy Editor on the Daily Mirror for three – the challenge was to keep an audience engaged across various platforms. Now news is bite-sized and too often people are manipulated into polarities without any real depth of knowledge, but I still believe there is a real place for print newspapers that offer depth of coverage and informed intelligent analysis.

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED?

Challenges keep you motivated! And running the women’s health charity Wellbeing of Women, as I do now, is both humbling and motivating. The funds we raise supports brilliant doctors to carry out medical research to find cures and treatments, and over the years their work has led to many of the treatments we all take for granted today. It’s remarkable, but even the use of ultrasound in pregnancy came about thanks to the work we funded.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO WOMEN WHO WANT TO FEEL MORE EMPOWERED IN THE WORKPLACE?

I would say: don’t make a big play of being a woman. Just be the best you can, be innovative, positive and have a ‘can do’ attitude.

WHO DO YOU MOST ADMIRE AND WHY?

My mum. For simply being the kindest, most loving woman there could be to her three children and five grandchildren.

WHAT'S YOUR PROUDEST ACHIEVEMENT?

Winning the Reporter of the Year award when I was about 27 was a good feeling. But even more rewarding was actually producing a newspaper you knew was going to be read by several million people and would, you hope, make a difference. For example, campaigns to support the elderly, to fight for the rights of victims from the pacific islands nuclear tests in the 1950s whose children suffer with cancers and deformities. Or even getting better treatment for soldiers suffering from PTSD. It was trying to give a voice to those who don’t have one.

IF YOU HADN'T BECOME A JOURNALIST, WHAT WOULD YOU BE?

A teacher. I think brilliant teachers are vital in shaping the next generations’ minds, views and attitudes, and I love the zeal and joy of children.

HOW DO YOU UNWIND?

In the bath with a heavy dose of aromatic oil or watching box sets.

WHERE IS YOUR HAPPY PLACE?

The Malvern Hills where I grew up. The wind, clean air, the views across the countryside as far as Wales, and childhood memories of tobogganing make it a special place.

WHICH BOOK WOULD YOU HIGHLY RECOMMEND?

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. It’s a defining story of love in all its guises. The central relationship between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff is passionate, destructive and ultimately doomed. Yet different types of love are reflected in the characters who revolve around the central pair. The book is both an unputdownable story and a meditation on love – a unique combination. It remains the gothic novel to end all gothic novels.

TOWN, COUNTRY
OR COAST

I love looking out to sea and the sense of freedom and calm it induces. I can sit there staring at the ocean in a catatonic state – until my four-year-old reminds me to build a moat around his sandcastle!